Tag: art history

Developing a Research Project about Using Virtual Reality in the Large-Lecture Humanities Classroom

This summer (2019) I am working with a wonderful undergraduate student (let’s call her L because I’ve not asked her if she wants to be named) on a collaborative research project. We applied for a summer undergraduate research project for funding, and we are working together for several months on the possible applications of virtual reality in the classroom. Neither… Read more →

The Politics of #arthistory/#arthistory as activism

Yesterday I was involved in a discussion over twitter that was initiated by @smarthistory. An initial question (how we can draw reverse the misconception of #arthistory, especially the idea that it is disconnected from politics and the world?) prompted some fascinating responses. It is a question that I often think about, especially when I am confronted with dumbfounded looks about… Read more →

Creating Application Activities: Team Based Learning for Art Historians

Creating meaningful and interesting application activities in a team-based learning art history class can be challenging. Some activities will come to you in a single “Aha!” moment, others will take hours of drafting, thinking, and reworking. Then, when you are in the classroom, some activities will work well, while those you think are brilliant and insightful might fail.   So… Read more →

Peer Evaluations: Team-Based Learning for Art Historians

[This post has been long in the making…] An important component of team-based learning, or TBL, is the peer evaluations. While TBL has many similarities to the “flipped classroom,” one of the main differences is that TBL factors peer evaluations into students’ final grades. There are plenty of good sources that discuss the process of peer evaluations, so I will… Read more →

Team-Based Learning in Art History: Pros and Cons

In the past year, I’ve become passionate about team-based learning, or TBL. TBL was an attractive pedagogical approach that seemed to go beyond simply flipping the classroom. My home institution decided more than a year ago to offer intensive training in TBL for faculty interested in new teaching methods. While I was writing my book manuscript, I decided I would… Read more →

Incorporating Digital Art History into the Curriculum

As the beginning of the semester rapidly approaches (and the summer sadly ends), I find myself trying to incorporate new digital tools into my three courses. After the GMU/Getty institute in Digital Art History ended, I began changing my syllabi to include more digital tools and projects. I have to remind myself not to overload students with all the wonderful… Read more →

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