Assessing the Usefulness and Validity of Online Sources, or Developing Information Literacy

A couple of years ago I published an article in the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy called “Doing Digital Art History in a Pre-Columbian Art Survey Class: Creating an Omeka Exhibition Around the Mixtec Codex Zouche-Nuttall (2018). As part of this essay I shared examples of assignments I use in a Pre-Columbian art class, which are part of a… Read more →

Is Achilles a Hero? Debates in the Large-Lecture Classroom

One of the best decisions I’ve made more recently is introducing debates into my large lecture (200+ students) class that focuses on the ancient and medieval Mediterranean world. They energized the class, helped students review material each week, and helped them to think more critically. They also helped to make a 3-hour class more bearable. If you are interested in… Read more →

Developing a Research Project about Using Virtual Reality in the Large-Lecture Humanities Classroom

This summer (2019) I am working with a wonderful undergraduate student (let’s call her L because I’ve not asked her if she wants to be named) on a collaborative research project. We applied for a summer undergraduate research project for funding, and we are working together for several months on the possible applications of virtual reality in the classroom. Neither… Read more →

Teaching in the face of trauma, part 2

(Trigger warnings: trauma, depression, PTSD) The spring semester has ended, and I’ve had some time to sit with my experience of it before writing this post. It seems fitting to write a follow up post to my earlier one that described some of my initial experiences with teaching after the traumas I’d endured in the fall semester, despite my reticence… Read more →

Retrieval Practice and the Flipped Classroom

“But how do you ensure that students will do the reading for a flipped classroom?” I have heard this question many, many times.  The success of the flipped classroom often hinges on whether or not the students have prepared outside the classroom in their individual spaces. How else will they be able to do in-class activities or apply information without… Read more →

Outlining an Intro Essay for Smarthistory: A Flipped Classroom Activity

In my last post, I posed the question of where does one even start in flipping the classroom. I’ve read a number of blog posts about this very idea. I’ve been to workshops that address the flipped classroom. But I always want tangibles. I want people to give me specific examples so that I can see how they actually did… Read more →

Flipping the Art History Classroom: Where do you even begin? Part 1

[This is post 1 of several posts that I will write about flipping the classroom. Stay tuned!] I recently gave a presentation at our center for teaching excellence about some ways in which I’ve flipped my classes. As a long-time “user” of team-based learning (TBL), I’ve had lots of successes and failures when it comes to flipping the classroom. I… Read more →

Learning to Take Notes about Material Presented in Videos: An Activity Using Smarthistory

Note taking. We all have our own individual ways that we like to take notes. Whatever our system might be, our notes need to help us retrieve information, to organize it, to make it accessible. I often find that my students struggle with note-taking. Not all of them, but many of them. They just haven’t found their system yet. Or… Read more →

css.php