About Me

Lauren Kilroy-EwbankI am currently an Associate Professor of Art History at Pepperdine University in Malibu, CA. Previously, I was an Assistant Professor of Art History at Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center within CUNY.

 I specialize in the art and architecture of the Spanish Colonial Americas (think Mexico and most of South America, 1492–1821), the Global Renaissance, and the Pre-Columbian Americas. Some of my current research focuses on images of the body and body parts, the intersection of art and science, the visual culture of death and dying, and food and art. At the moment, I have a forthcoming book manuscript on the Sacred Heart in Colonial Mexico. I am also interested in digital art history and the digital humanities more broadly, as much of this site details. I am always looking for new, creative ways to improve my teaching, and I spend more time than I care to admit reading books about pedagogy. I serve as a Contributing Editor, Content Contributor, and Board Member for Smarthistory (which is also on Khan Academy).

I have spent  a lot of time in Peru, Ecuador, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Mexico, Spain, and the southwestern U.S. I am fortunate to have traveled more broadly to Ireland, Scotland, England, France, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, Greece, Turkey, Tanzania, Thailand, and Canada. I try to travel as often as possible, and encourage students to study abroad should they have the opportunity to do so.

How did I get into Art History? As an undergraduate, I majored in Biology and History in a special B.A./M.D. program. During my sophomore year I took Art History 101 (“Caves to Cathedrals”) as a G.E. requirement and fell in love with the subject. After finishing my B.A. and M.A., I began a Ph.D. in Art History at UCLA. I earned my Ph.D in 2009.

I have taught at UCLA, the University of Oregon, CUNY-Brooklyn College, and the CUNY Graduate Center.

On a more personal note, I am the proud mama of a wild, adventurous, and silly 1 year-old daughter. She keeps me on my toes and reminds me (every day) that there is more to life than work.

 

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