Author: LKE

The Balancing Act of the Large Lecture Class

For any of us who have taught large lecture classes (let’s say 100+ students), we are all too familiar with the huge demands on our time and energy. I regularly teach of class of 200+ students, which for me breaks down (on average) to: 6-7 hours of office hours/appointments with students/week 6-10 hours of class prep/week (usually more, but I’m… Read more →

How do we create a field of Public Art History?

After my last post on Public Art History (PAH), I’ve continued to think about what a field of PAH might look like. With the continuing decline in academic positions, especially in the humanities, could a field of Public Art History help to develop more career options outside of academia? With a field of Public Art History, could we shift the… Read more →

What is Public Art History?

Today, over breakfast, a colleague and I touched upon the topic of Public Art History, particularly what it is in relationship to Smarthistory (a project with which we are both involved and feel passionately about developing). I once again raised the idea that there should be Public Art History, or at least a more formalized idea of what Public Art… Read more →

Games/Activities for Review

I am always on the search for new, interesting ways to engage students and break up my lectures into more manageable chunks. This past semester (fall 2016) I was faced with a couple of new challenges that forced me more than ever before to develop in-class activities. I was returning to work full time after a semester of maternity leave… Read more →

Goals for 2017

I keep telling myself that I will add a new post every 2 months, but then I always seem to forget (blame sleep deprivation). My goal for 2017 is to post more actively, for me more than anyone or anything else. I find that if I draft a post about what I’ve been doing in class, it helps me think… Read more →

Activities for the large lecture class

Now that the Fall semester has ended, I’ve started to reflect on what types of in-class activities worked well and which ones failed or simply need tweaking. In the end, I realize that activities that are successful might eventually work less well depending on the time of the semester. For this reason, I can’t stress enough how important it is… Read more →

Teaching the Large Lecture Course: Some Reflections

This fall semester I am teaching a large lecture course on the Western Humanities. I have around 240 students for a 90-minute class that covers caves through cathedrals (basically, 40,000 BCE–1350 CE). We cover history, philosophy, literature, art history, theater history, music history, and more. It is daunting to think of covering so much material in a relatively short period… Read more →

Creating Application Activities: Team Based Learning for Art Historians

Creating meaningful and interesting application activities in a team-based learning art history class can be challenging. Some activities will come to you in a single “Aha!” moment, others will take hours of drafting, thinking, and reworking. Then, when you are in the classroom, some activities will well, while those you think are brilliant and insightful might fail.   So what… Read more →

Peer Evaluations: Team-Based Learning for Art Historians

[This post has been long in the making…] An important component of team-based learning, or TBL, is the peer evaluations. While TBL has many similarities to the “flipped classroom,” one of the main differences is that TBL factors peer evaluations into students’ final grades. There are plenty of good sources that discuss the process of peer evaluations, so I will… Read more →

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